Creating Luck

Ideas that will grow your business

How I wrote my first book and got it to #1 on Amazon

Many of us want to write our first book, but never get started. Getting your book ranked highly on Amazon is an even greater challenge. There’s good news: writing your first book has gotten much easier in the last 5 years. In case you have book idea in your head and want to get it in print, here’s the tale of how I wrote my first book and got it to #1 on Amazon. I hope the story inspires you to write yours.

I’ve always enjoyed writing. I write for my company’s blog, MailerMailer, my personal blog, Creating Luck, and guest posts on other blogs. I write white papers, ebooks, and marketing material. Like many people, perhaps you, I’ve always wanted to write a book. The project seemed so overwhelming that I never got around to it. Last summer, I decided that I would finally do it.

Here’s what I did and my timeline:

Getting Started

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1. July-September 2012: Created an outline based on the book’s target market: small technology companies. I researched Amazon thoroughly to see if there are other books of this type and found none, which really surprised me. Most marketing books are very general in nature. There was nothing for such a focused niche market. My goal wasn’t to sell tens of thousands of books. It was to educate small IT companies on how to grow their business. I remember when I started my first company I had no idea what I was doing and a book like this would have given me a solid foundation and numerous strategies to implement. I wanted to share what I learned over the last 20 years in building businesses.

Creating a book outline was the hardest part, especially keeping it focused. My outline was fairly detailed. I included bullet points of the specific topics I wanted to cover in each chapter. I rewrote the outline repeatedly, even as I wrote the chapters. I would always find something to add or remove to keep it tight. One of my pet peeves is books that could have been condensed into an article, where the author deliberately goes on and on with fluff that doesn’t add any value. I didn’t want my book to be like that so I spent a lot of time up front crystallizing my thoughts so that each chapter had valuable insights.

I revised the title at least 25 times before finally settling on The IT Marketing Crash Course: How to Get Clients for Your Technology Business.

2. September-October 2012: Started writing the chapters. I put appointments with myself on my calendar to block off time. That was the only way I was able to set aside the time to do this. Otherwise, my calendar would fill up with, well, life. Hit a snag: this was taking WAY too long. I was reminded of the famous Red Smith quote about how easy writing is: “You simply sit down at the typewriter, open your veins and bleed.”

Moving Forward

3. November-December 2012: Hired a transcriber to help speed up the process. After I wrote the first 3 chapters, which took 3 months, I figured it would take me another year before I finished at my current pace. To speed things up, I would record an audio file of my thoughts for each remaining chapter. My helper was also a writer so if some of my sentences weren’t clear, she could fix them as she put my spoken words in print form. She sent me text versions of my recorded thoughts for each chapter, which I then edited (very heavily) to create the final drafts. Writing the book this way was significantly easier since I could articulate my thoughts verbally by looking at my outline’s notes. This was a more natural way for me to communicate so doing this step sped up the writing process quite a bit. I was able to get the first full draft of the book (14 chapters total) done in another 2 months.

I included an action-item checklist at the end of each chapter and a master checklist at the end of the book so readers had specific steps to take to grow their business. I also added a sample budget of what the marketing investment should be in a small IT company, itemizing each tactic and its estimated monthly and yearly cost.

4. October 2012-January 2013: Interviewed lots of companies. I didn’t want the book to just be a write up of my knowledge. I wanted to include real-life examples of companies using the concepts I presented. I also didn’t want it to be a list of my clients – that would have been too self-serving. So, I interviewed people in my close and extended networks. I reached out to colleagues on LinkedIn and through discussion groups I participate in. Many people volunteered.

My questions during the interviews centered on the book’s topics since I was looking for examples to enhance each chapter. Adding stories made the book come to life. It made it much more enjoyable and easier to read. More so, the interviews made the book much easier to write! Since the questions I posed related to my outline, I was able to tell stories about real experiences from real companies. Much of the text was right there in my interview notes. I simply had to massage it to fit smoothly in each chapter.

5. February 2013: Hired an editor to review the final draft. She found many typos and other issues.

Preparing to Go Live

6. February-March 2013: Prepared the book’s layout in Word. Saved it as a PDF to send as review copy (added security: text in PDF file could not be copied from the review copy).

7. February 2013: Hired a designer to create the cover and the book’s website, www.itmarketingbook.com. She did an amazing job. I included a QR code on the back cover that goes to the book’s website where people can sign up for “extras” like templates, spreadsheets, checklists and other usable files that I couldn’t include in the book itself.

8. Early March 2013: Sent it to my inner circle for comments and quotes for the back cover. Then, sent it to others outside my close circle. Over 40 people reviewed the book and I got plenty of useful comments. I made so many edits that it increased the book’s length by 20 pages. I also got quite a few wonderful quotes to use on the back cover and on the IT Marketing book’s website.

Coordinating Publicity

9. Early March 2013: Read through Amazon’s publishing pages: CreateSpace and Kindle Direct Publishing. I decided to go the self-publishing route after reading about how so many famous authors are now abandoning their publishing houses because they can do so much more on their own – and do it faster. Crush It with Kindle is a low-priced Kindle book that does a wonderful job explaining what to do. I used it as my guide. I finally got the book online on Amazon in Kindle and print formats and ordered the proof of the print edition. Loved it! I finally had my book in my hand, no longer just in my mind. Had a sangria to celebrate!

10. Early March 2013: Sent an email to 21 bloggers that cover the business aspects of IT requesting that they review the book since it is a good fit with their audience. Of the 21 I contacted, 7 replied and reviewed the book, posting their review on the launch date which I had set as March 18, 2013. I had concentrated the effort to focus on one day, my arbitrary “launch date,” after reading about how bestseller lists work: all bestseller lists are ranked based on volume over time. If you sell 1,000 books over 1 year, your book is ranked much lower than if you sell 1,000 in a week. The rankings change based on units sold each week, or in Amazon’s case, every day.

11. March 18, 2013: Posted a press release through PRWeb announcing the book and notified a handful of other publications, sending them a copy of the press release. Reminded my reviewers about the book’s launch and provided them with a sample tweet they could share – many of them posted news of the book in their blogs, tweets and LinkedIn and Facebook status updates. I also mentioned the book in a few relevant discussion groups I am actively involved in.

12. Week of March 18, 2013: The book hit #1 on Amazon in 3 business categories due to this publicity effort. Amazon allowed me to make the book available for free on the launch date, which spurred a download frenzy – over 500 in one day for a niche market book! Even after the free download day was over and people had to buy it, sales were strong and kept it at #1.

I couldn’t have done it without the help of several people – including those I interviewed – who provided the support to get it off the ground. The people I hired were staff members that work with me. If you don’t have an existing team that can help, you can find freelancers who can pitch in. Just advertise on guru.com, elance.com or CraigsList under “writing gigs”. If I hadn’t solicited help, the book would still be a dream and I would probably still be writing chapter 4.

So, what do you say? Ready to write your book? It’s actually easier than you might think. Just schedule a little time on your calendar and get started. You could be a #1 Amazon bestselling author before you make your next New Year’s resolution!

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6 thoughts on “How I wrote my first book and got it to #1 on Amazon

  1. Thank you! I enjoyed this article and will definitely use it to help me clear out this book Ive been trying to write…forever!

    • Thanks for the feedback. I found the process to go pretty quickly once the first draft was done. I became quite energized by how close to the end of the tunnel I was that I was able to push it through to completion. Good luck with writing yours! It’s a fun experience.

  2. Great post, Raj. You are clear, creative, and generous–as always.

  3. Raj,
    Great to share the speaking platform with you at Vistage. Really enjoyed this post because you were very specific. I am working on a book and this information, especially the schedule of attack is so helpful.
    Liz

  4. Dennis on said:

    Very concise and valuable overview of your book-writing process. Nicely done. Thanks for taking the time to share the insights and tips!

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